Skip to content

Dayna Kneeland, “Finding Working: The Gift of Facing our Fears.”

January 28, 2014
"Community Action Employment Plan" records some of the peer to peer support self advocates in B.C. have created opportunities for, hosted by Self Advocates for a Brighter Future in Victoria

“Community Action Employment Plan” records some of the peer to peer support self advocates in B.C. have created opportunities for, hosted by Self Advocates for a Brighter Future in Victoria

We all want to find meaningful work, to connect with others and contribute to the growth of our communities. However, as great as work is, moving towards it means that we will need to face many fears. Am I good enough? Will I be rejected? Will I be accepted for who I am or will I have to change to fit someone else’s needs?

If we need support looking for work, those who are helping us are faced with similar fears. Am I good enough? Am I helping in the right ways? Will my efforts be viewed as successful by my friends and community? How much will I need to step out of my comfort zone to help someone else reach their goals?

Employers face these same fears as well. Will this person help me achieve the goals that help me feel valued in the world? Will they accept me and my needs? Will I have to change the ways I am most comfortable working to fit the needs of someone else?

A huge part of looking for a new job is to face our biggest fears. But is this truly a bad thing? What is really happening when we come up against our fear? Facing our fears is uncomfortable and challenging. Yet, if we look inside ourselves we can see that it is also an opportunity for growth, for becoming more compassionate and understanding towards others, and developing new areas of confidence.

For me, the best thing about facing my fears is that it gives me a chance to see whether or not I am able to accept myself and others for who we are. Sometimes, when I approach an employer who may or may not want to hire me, I can get so caught in my fears that I forget to try to get to know that person, discover what it is that makes them unique and special, and find out what desires we have in common. Denise Bissonnette suggests that we should approach one another with genuine curiosity. She also talks about softening our views of ourselves and others. To me, this means looking for what we have in common rather than the hard edges of what makes us different. It might take a while for an employer to move beyond their own fears about hiring us, but we can help them out by moving past our own. We can learn to be patient with them by learning to be patient with ourselves. Looking for work may be the hardest work of all, but it is also an exciting opportunity. As we step out into the world to find a job, we realize that we are all learning together how to soften our views and accept ourselves and others for who we are.

To learn more about Denise Bissonnette’s work, click here.  

We love this new article by Denise, Embracing an Ethic of Reverence in Life and Work  

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: